NEWS: Made In Space 3D Printer Will Go Early

Made in Space mission to send a 3D printer to the International Space Station (ISS). And of course, Shane’s excellent 3D Printing & Space series has considered the implications and potential future extrapolation such an achievement could mean.

The latest news from Made in Space in collaboration with NASA is that the programme is ahead of schedule, and the 3D printer is all set to head into orbit three months earlier than planned. This coming August in fact. The launch of the 3D printer was originally scheduled for November 2014.

made2-1024x764

The 3D printer in question has reportedly passed all of the checks required by NASA, conducted at the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama over 20,000+ hours. The results have been pleasing and have met all of the requirements for use aboard the International Space Station.

According to Niki Werkheiser, the NASA 3D Print project manager: “NASA was able to provide key guidance on how to best comply with strenuous space certification, safety and operational requirements, and Made In Space excelled at incorporating that insight into the design. As a result, the hardware passed testing with flying colors. Made In Space now has first-hand experience of the full ‘A-to-Z’ process for designing, building and testing hardware for spaceflight.”

As a result the 3D printer will take its place aboard the next cargo mission heading to the Space Station, slated for August but no actual date is yet confirmed, by the private company SpaceX.

“The ability to manufacture on demand in space is going to be a paradigm shift for the way development, research and exploration happen in space,” said Michael Snyder, lead engineer and director of R&D for Made In Space.

The plan is to install the 3D printer within the space station’s Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), where its first job will be to 3D print a set of test parts and tools that will subsequently be sent back to Earth for analysis and to ensure final qualification of the process in its intended environment. If this final testing proves successful a permanent 3D printer will be installed in-situ aboard the space station.

“Passing the final tests and shipping the hardware are significant milestones, but they ultimately lead to an even more meaningful one — the capability for anyone on Earth to have the option of printing objects on the ISS,” said Made In Space CEO Aaron Kemmer. “This is unprecedented access to space.”

Source: 3D Printing Industry

Author: 

Rachel is Editor-in-Chief of 3DPI and manages the content of the site and the writing team. With a 20-year history of writing and editing in the 3D printing sector, she brings a wealth of experience to 3DPI including the ability to balance reality with the exciting potential that this technology presents. Rachel is a BA (Honors) graduate in English.

1 month ago / 3 notes
CODE: Arduino Controlled Motion Sensor

Arduino Controlled Motion Sensor:

Parallax Sensor Code:

/*

 Arduino Controlled Passive Infrared Motion Sensor

 LemonSlice7 - Instructables.com

 */

int calibrationTime = 30;       

boolean sensorActive = false;

boolean previousSensorState = false;

int pirPin = 4;    //the digital pin connected to the PIR sensor’s output

int ledPin = 5;

 

// setup phase

void setup(){

  Serial.begin(9600);

  pinMode(pirPin, INPUT);

  pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT);

  digitalWrite(pirPin, LOW);

  //give the sensor some time to calibrate

  Serial.println(“Sensor Calibration in Progress”);

  Serial.println(“———————————————”);

  for(int i = 0; i < calibrationTime; i++){

    Serial.print(“.”);

    digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);

    delay(250);

    digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);

    delay(250);

    digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);

    delay(250);

    digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);

    delay(250);

  }

  Serial.println(“”);

  Serial.println(“Sensor Calibration Completed”);

  Serial.println(“Sensor Reading Active”);

  delay(50);

  sensorActive = false;

  previousSensorState = false;

}

// loop sequence

void loop()

{

  // takes the pin value and saves it to the sensorActive boolean value

  if(digitalRead(pirPin) == HIGH)

  {

    sensorActive = true;

    digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);

  }

  if(digitalRead(pirPin) == LOW)

  {

    sensorActive = false;

    digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);

  }

  // performs action if the state of the sensor changes

  // since this is a loop, here is now it works:

  // if the sensor pin goes HIGH (on) after it being LOW (off), the sensorActive value changes from the previousSensorState value.

  // it then turns on the LED. when the pin goes LOW (off) it will do the same thing but opposite values.

  // it also prints status to serial. it will print the time of triggering by providing the number of seconds that have passed since the program started.

  if(sensorActive != previousSensorState)

  {

    if(sensorActive == true)

    {

      previousSensorState = sensorActive;

      Serial.println(“—-“);

      Serial.print(“Motion Detected At: “);

      Serial.print(millis()/1000);

      Serial.println(” Seconds”);

      delay(50);

    }

    if(sensorActive == false)

    {

      previousSensorState = sensorActive;

      Serial.println(“—-“);

      Serial.print(“Motion Stopped At: “);

      Serial.print(millis()/1000);

      Serial.println(” Seconds”);

      delay(50);

    }

  }

}

 

PIR Sensor Code V2:

/*

 Arduino Liquid Crystal Circuit

 *LCD RS pin to pin

 *LCD R/W pin to Ground

 *LCD Enable pin to pin

 *LCD D4 pin to pin

 *LCD D5 pin to pin

 *LCD D6 pin to pin

 *LCD D7 pin to pin

 *Backlight Circuit

 [5v Supply -> 330Ω resistor -> Backlight Positive Pin]

 [Backlight Ground Pin -> NPN Collector]

 [NPN Emitter -> Ground]

 [NPN Base to pin]

 *10kΩ potentiometer wiper to VO pin 0 of LCD

 LiquidCrystal lcd(RSpin, enablePin, D4pin, D5pin, D6pin, D7pin);

 */

//include the Arduino LiquidCrystal Library

#include <LiquidCrystal.h>

//initializes library with these interface pins

boolean sensorActive = false;

boolean previousSensorState = false;

int pirPin = 3;

int RSpin = 4;

int enablePin = 5;

int D4pin = 6;

int D5pin = 7;

int D6pin = 8;

int D7pin = 9;

int lightLCD = 10;

int serialVal1 = 0;

int unsigned long lastMillis = 0;

LiquidCrystal lcd(RSpin, enablePin, D4pin, D5pin, D6pin, D7pin);

void initializeLCD()

{

  digitalWrite(lightLCD,HIGH);

  lcd.setCursor(0, 0);

  lcd.print(“  Arduino LCD Test  “);

  lcd.setCursor(0, 2);

  lcd.print(“   Please Wait…   “);

  delay(1000);

  cycleLCD();

  lcd.clear();

}

void initializePIR()

{

  lcd.setCursor(0,3);

  lcd.setCursor(0, 0);

  lcd.print(“Initializing”);

  lcd.setCursor(0,1);

  lcd.print(“PIR Sensor Module”);

  lcd.setCursor(0,3);

  for (int i=0; i < 20; i++)

  {

    lcd.write(0);

    delay(1500); // default 1500ms

  }

  delay(1000);

  lcd.clear();

}

void createCharLCD()

{

  byte block[8] = {

    B11111,

    B11111,

    B11111,

    B11111,

    B11111,

    B11111,

    B11111,

    B11111,

  };

  lcd.createChar(0, block);

}

void lcdReset()

{

  lcd.clear();

  lcd.setCursor(0, 0);

  lcd.print(“Awaiting Input      “); 

}

void cycleLCD()

{

  lcd.setCursor(0,0);

  for (int i=0; i <= 80; i = i + 1)

  {

    lcd.write(0);

    delay(10);

  }

  lcd.setCursor(0,0);

  for (int i=0; i <= 80; i = i + 1)

  {

    lcd.print(” “);

    delay(10);

  }

}

void setup()

{

  Serial.begin(9600);

  pinMode(lightLCD, OUTPUT);

  lcd.begin(20, 4); //setup LCD as a 20x4 layout

  pinMode(pirPin, INPUT);

  createCharLCD();

  initializeLCD();

  initializePIR();

  lastMillis = millis();

}

void loop()

{

  lcd.setCursor(0, 0);

  lcd.print(“Arduino PIR Sensor”);

  if(digitalRead(pirPin) == HIGH)

  {

    sensorActive = true;

  }

  if(digitalRead(pirPin) == LOW)

  {

    sensorActive = false;

  }

  // performs action if the state of the sensor changes

  // since this is a loop, here is now it works:

  // if the sensor pin goes HIGH (on) after it being LOW (off), the sensorActive value changes from the previousSensorState value.

  // it then turns on the LED. when the pin goes LOW (off) it will do the same thing but opposite values.

  // it also prints status to serial. it will print the time of triggering by providing the number of seconds that have passed since th

  // program started.

    if(sensorActive != previousSensorState)

  {

    if(sensorActive == true)

    {

      previousSensorState = sensorActive;

      lcd.setCursor(0, 2);

      lcd.print(“Motion Detected At: “);

      lcd.setCursor(0, 3);

      lcd.print(millis()/1000);

      lcd.print(” Seconds”);

      Serial.print(“Motion Detected At: “);

      Serial.print(millis()/1000);

      Serial.println(” Seconds”);

      delay(50);

    }

    if(sensorActive == false)

    {

      previousSensorState = sensorActive;

      lcd.setCursor(0, 2);

      lcd.print(“Motion Stopped At:  “);

      lcd.setCursor(0, 3);

      lcd.print(millis()/1000);

      lcd.print(” Seconds”);

      Serial.print(“Motion Stopped At: “);

      Serial.print(millis()/1000);

      Serial.println(” Seconds”);

      delay(50);

    }

  }

}

-END CODE-

Reference Source:

http://arduinotronics.blogspot.com/2013/01/motion-sensors-ssrs.html

http://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Arduino-Motion-Sensor-Lighting-Control/

http://arduinotronics.blogspot.com/2012/03/light-sensing-with-cds-ldr.html
http://www.instructables.com/id/Arduino-Motion-Sensor-Control-Led-Light/?ALLSTEPS
http://www.instructables.com/id/Arduino-Controlled-Motion-Sensor/ 

3 months ago / 3 notes
Digital to Physical Designs with Autodesk »

3dhubs:

So you want to print 3D designs, but you don’t own a 3D printer and you think it might be hard to design and build what you want? Well, as of today, it’s faster and easier than ever before for everyone to 3D print. Today marks the launch of the 3D Hubs 3D API, an enterprise-grade print network…

(via we-designs)

3 months ago / 5 notes
Printrbot GO Family - Small, Medium, and Large
Specs and Information:Go Small - $1299
Single extruder
8” x 6” x 6” build volume
12mm bars for X, Y, Z
GT2 belts/pulleys
fits in a Pelican 1550 case perfectly
Raspberry Pi loaded with Octoprint (control the Printrbot over WiFi)
Folding design, optional covers and handle included
Outside case dimensions (without handle &amp; covers)
Fully Assembled by a Printrbot Assembly Professional
Go Medium - $1499
Dual extruder (includes ExtrudrBoard)
16” x 8” x 8” build volume&#160;!
12mm bars for X, Y, Z
GT2 belts/pulleys
ATX power supply inside case
Optional: Ready to add battery and print unplugged
Raspberry Pi loaded with Octoprint (control the Printrbot over WiFi)
Folding design, optional covers and handle included
Outside case dimensions (without handle &amp; covers)
Fully Assembled by a Printrbot Assembly Professional

Go Large - $1699
Triple extruder (includes ExtrudrBoard)
24” x 12”x 12” build volume&#160;!!
12mm bars for X, Y, Z
GT2 belts/pulleys
ATX power supply inside case
Optional: Ready to add battery and print unplugged
Raspberry Pi loaded with Octoprint (control the Printrbot over WiFi)
Folding design, optional covers and handle included
Outside case dimensions (without handle &amp; covers)
Fully Assembled by a Printrbot Assembly Professional
~ Printrbot Newsletter 4 months ago / 18 notes
TOOLING: All-Metal Printerbot Simple
All-Metal Printrbot Simple
Specs:
Price: TBD
Release Date: 2014
Build Volume: 6″ x 6″ x 6″ (150mm x 150mm x 150mm)
Print Resolution: 100 Microns
Filament: 1.75 PLA
Hot End: 1.75 Ubis Hot End with 0.4mm Nozzle
Construction: Steel and Aluminum Body
Finish: Powder Coated
Print Bed: Semi-Auto Leveling via Software
Belt: GT2
Pulley: Aluminum
Rods: 12mm
Product Weight: 8 lbs
Print Software: Compatible with Repetier Host and Pronterface
More info: makezine.com

All-Metal Printrbot Simple
Specs:
Price: TBD
Release Date: 2014
Build Volume: 6″ x 6″ x 6″ (150mm x 150mm x 150mm)
Print Resolution: 100 Microns
Filament: 1.75 PLA
Hot End: 1.75 Ubis Hot End with 0.4mm Nozzle
Construction: Steel and Aluminum Body
Finish: Powder Coated
Print Bed: Semi-Auto Leveling via Software
Belt: GT2
Pulley: Aluminum
Rods: 12mm
Product Weight: 8 lbs
Print Software: Compatible with Repetier Host and Pronterface
More info: makezine.com

All-Metal Printrbot Simple
Specs:
Price: TBD
Release Date: 2014
Build Volume: 6″ x 6″ x 6″ (150mm x 150mm x 150mm)
Print Resolution: 100 Microns
Filament: 1.75 PLA
Hot End: 1.75 Ubis Hot End with 0.4mm Nozzle
Construction: Steel and Aluminum Body
Finish: Powder Coated
Print Bed: Semi-Auto Leveling via Software
Belt: GT2
Pulley: Aluminum
Rods: 12mm
Product Weight: 8 lbs
Print Software: Compatible with Repetier Host and Pronterface
More info: makezine.com

All-Metal Printrbot Simple
Specs:
Price: TBD
Release Date: 2014
Build Volume: 6″ x 6″ x 6″ (150mm x 150mm x 150mm)
Print Resolution: 100 Microns
Filament: 1.75 PLA
Hot End: 1.75 Ubis Hot End with 0.4mm Nozzle
Construction: Steel and Aluminum Body
Finish: Powder Coated
Print Bed: Semi-Auto Leveling via Software
Belt: GT2
Pulley: Aluminum
Rods: 12mm
Product Weight: 8 lbs
Print Software: Compatible with Repetier Host and Pronterface
More info: makezine.com

All-Metal Printrbot Simple
Specs:
Price: TBD
Release Date: 2014
Build Volume: 6″ x 6″ x 6″ (150mm x 150mm x 150mm)
Print Resolution: 100 Microns
Filament: 1.75 PLA
Hot End: 1.75 Ubis Hot End with 0.4mm Nozzle
Construction: Steel and Aluminum Body
Finish: Powder Coated
Print Bed: Semi-Auto Leveling via Software
Belt: GT2
Pulley: Aluminum
Rods: 12mm
Product Weight: 8 lbs
Print Software: Compatible with Repetier Host and Pronterface
More info: makezine.com

All-Metal Printrbot Simple
Specs:
Price: TBD
Release Date: 2014
Build Volume: 6″ x 6″ x 6″ (150mm x 150mm x 150mm)
Print Resolution: 100 Microns
Filament: 1.75 PLA
Hot End: 1.75 Ubis Hot End with 0.4mm Nozzle
Construction: Steel and Aluminum Body
Finish: Powder Coated
Print Bed: Semi-Auto Leveling via Software
Belt: GT2
Pulley: Aluminum
Rods: 12mm
Product Weight: 8 lbs
Print Software: Compatible with Repetier Host and Pronterface
More info: makezine.com

All-Metal Printrbot Simple
Specs:
Price: TBD
Release Date: 2014
Build Volume: 6″ x 6″ x 6″ (150mm x 150mm x 150mm)
Print Resolution: 100 Microns
Filament: 1.75 PLA
Hot End: 1.75 Ubis Hot End with 0.4mm Nozzle
Construction: Steel and Aluminum Body
Finish: Powder Coated
Print Bed: Semi-Auto Leveling via Software
Belt: GT2
Pulley: Aluminum
Rods: 12mm
Product Weight: 8 lbs
Print Software: Compatible with Repetier Host and Pronterface
More info: makezine.com

All-Metal Printrbot Simple
Specs:
Price: TBD
Release Date: 2014
Build Volume: 6″ x 6″ x 6″ (150mm x 150mm x 150mm)
Print Resolution: 100 Microns
Filament: 1.75 PLA
Hot End: 1.75 Ubis Hot End with 0.4mm Nozzle
Construction: Steel and Aluminum Body
Finish: Powder Coated
Print Bed: Semi-Auto Leveling via Software
Belt: GT2
Pulley: Aluminum
Rods: 12mm
Product Weight: 8 lbs
Print Software: Compatible with Repetier Host and Pronterface
More info: makezine.com

Specs:

  • Price: TBD
  • Release Date: 2014
  • Build Volume: 6″ x 6″ x 6″ (150mm x 150mm x 150mm)
  • Print Resolution: 100 Microns
  • Filament: 1.75 PLA
  • Hot End: 1.75 Ubis Hot End with 0.4mm Nozzle
  • Construction: Steel and Aluminum Body
  • Finish: Powder Coated
  • Print Bed: Semi-Auto Leveling via Software
  • Belt: GT2
  • Pulley: Aluminum
  • Rods: 12mm
  • Product Weight: 8 lbs
  • Print Software: Compatible with Repetier Host and Pronterface

More info: makezine.com

(via personalfactory)

5 months ago / 1 notes
NEWS: Most Popular Programming Languages of 2014

February 3, 2014

Every year we release data on the “Most Popular Programming Languages” based on thousands of data points we’ve collected by processing over 100,000+ coding tests and challenges by over 2,000+ employers.

This gives us a pretty good idea on what the trends  are for the upcoming year in terms of what companies are looking for.  It’s data we hope will be especially helpful for new computer sciences graduates or coders looking to stay ahead of the curve. 

For the third year in a row, Python retains it’s #1 dominance followed by Java, C++, and Javascript.

This year’s most noticeable changes were a 300% increase in Objective-C submissions, a 100% surge in C#, as well as a 33% increase in Javascript submissions while PHP lost -55%, Perl dropped -16%, and Java shrank -14%. 

- See more at: http://blog.codeeval.com/codeevalblog/2014#.UwFI1_2Vup0

Another major index to look at is from TIBOE which is a more accurate measure of language market share compared to the CodeEval index which is a much better indicator for language popularity in industry. 

This of course shouldn’t be the only consideration used in choosing a programming language. Read this recent write up from our friends at CodingforInterviews.com for some more insights.

About CodeEval

CodeEval is an exclusive community of over 24,000+ competitive developers. Members can compete with each other, challenge their friends and build out their profiles to showcase their coding skills. Get started on your first coding challenge here (there are over 129!) 

For companies, over  2,000+ employers have company profiles and screen candidates on the CodeEval platform. Join today and create a FREE company profile

@codeeval #programming2014

- See more at: http://blog.codeeval.com/codeevalblog/2014#.UwFI1_2Vup0

5 months ago / 0 notes
mat-fab:

3D Printing is Now the Future
Source: computersciencehub.org
5 months ago / 32 notes
5 months ago / 8 notes
personalfactory:

“Ninja Printer Plate developed by Wayne Huthmaker. This plate replaces the need for painters tape, kapton tape or other surface preparation on FDM style 3D printers.” ~ 3ders.org
5 months ago / 1 notes
personalfactory:

29th of March: A celebration of 10 years of Arduino and its worldwide community
5 months ago / 17 notes
photo set »

personalfactory:

The EX¹ - rapid 3D printing of circuit boards

In a carefully timed and precisely calculated move, the Australian Cartesian Co. has launched its Kickstarter campaign today, at 2pm GMT, introducing The EX¹ 3D printer. And this is most certainly NOT just another 3D printer. The EX¹ has been developed to print electronics and circuit boards as quickly and as easily as printing a photo, according to the company.

So when I say ‘carefully timed’, this is due to the fact that the Cartesian Co. has coordinated the launch of its campaign to coincide with the 2-year anniversary of an article in Wired that said that ‘within two years 3D printers would print electronic circuits.

The EX¹ is a desktop device, utilising inkjet technology to print in elemental silver on a range of different substrates in the same way an inkjet printer does. It claims to make the printing of complex circuits simple and quick for a range of applications — from a gamepad remote control for example, to wearable technology.

There is a real barrier into the world of complex circuitry, and Cartesian Co. wants to make electronics accessible for the every day person - giving them the power to bring their ideas to life through creativity and experimentation. We’ve been thinking about how to design a printer that creates circuit boards for four years now and developed the EX¹ over the last 9 months, and we hope the Kickstarter community will feel as passionate about the project as we do. ~ Ariel Briner (Co Founder and Head of Electrical Design at Cartesian)

~ 3dprintingindustry.com

Currently:

140 Backers
$69,163 pledged of $30,000 goal
28 days to go

Prices starting from $899 for Early Bird KIT (all gone) Now you can get it for $1,499 or more :)

personalfactory:

This device is able to make a little earthquake on rapid prototyping and 3d printing markets. On one hand you have to know a little bit about preparing circuit boards and  electronics to create useful stuff. On the other one number of applications for this technology seems to be endless and because of that army of amateurs will start tinkering and learning new skills just to create their dreamed projects. As you can see on above pictures this technology can’t create whole electronic devices (for example functioning cellphone) but… now it will be much easier and faster to test the idea of our prototype. I am very excited about development of this project! Great job Cartesian Team!

8 months ago / 43 notes
CONFERENCE: TxA Interactive (Cooperative Fabrications)

Presenting as a panelist at the TxA Interactive - Cooperative Fabrications (Texas Society of Architects 74th Annual Convention and Design Expo in Fort Worth). (). Swing by.

TxA Interactive Session 3: Cooperative Fabrications

Category/Track/LUHs

CE Sessions
Technology
1.50 LUH

Schedule

Saturday, November 9, 2013 
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Class Code: 134

Room / Location

Room 104 / Convention Center First Floor

Description

TxA Interactive continues into its third session, exploring research from across the world on how innovations in digital technology are affecting architecture.

Presentations in this session:

Slo_GEN Table

Mark Cabrinha, Ph.D, R.A., Associate Professor, Architecture Department, California Polytechnic State University

SYNTHETIC MANUFACTURING: RESILIENT MODULAR SYSTEM (RMS)

Prof Wendy W Fok, Assistant Professor, Digital Media and Design Program, Gerald D. Hines CoA Doctoral Candidate, Doctor of Design, Harvard GSD

Fun Geometry

Jason Scroggin, Assistant Professor, University of Kentucky, College of Design, School of Architecture; Principal, Design Office Takebayashi Scroggin

Cast Thicket: Innovations into lightweight concrete fabrication

Brad Bell, the University of Texas at Arlington Campus and Digital Fabrication and Parametric Modeling Lab

2013 TxA Interactive Chair: Kory Bieg, Assistant Professor, The University of Texas at Austin, School of Architecture, Principal OTA+

Note

1 Tickets per registrant limit

8 months ago / 0 notes
DRONES: Hexa drone - MadLab Industries

    “When the robots finally come to harvest us, they’ll probably descend from the skies and then scuttle, spider-like, into our homes and shelters, just likeMadLab Industries‘ terrifyingly ominous HexaThe combined horror of a six-bladed hexacopter and a 6-legged hexapod, the omnidirectional robot can either tackle terrain on-foot or take to the air to avoid obstacles, then using the multipurpose legs as a grapple to snatch up objects (objects that, it has to be said, are roughly the size of a human baby’s head in MLI’s demo video).

The DIY ‘bot pairs a PhantomX Hexapod kit and a custom MLI hexacopter, using carbon-fiber and aluminum components to keep the weight down. In total, the whole thing tips the scales at 10.8 pounds, and is strong enough to not only transport its own weight, but light objects it can grasp with its legs.

Possible future improvements could include the ability for the two sections to detach and be independently controlled, meaning Hexa could fly in, deposit the hexapod, and then fly back out again. That could eventually be useful for search & rescue operations, transporting Hexa-style hunting drones to a disaster area and then leaving them to rummage through the rubble for survivors.”

slashgear.com

personalfactory: This project is absolutely astonishing. I don’t give a fcuk it may be used by bad guys in some totalitarian regime, army or terrorists…

… it is possible to use it in so many good and harmless ways:

  • recognition drone to build 3d map of rooms where terrorists hidden hostages
  • swarm of Hexas building shelters for unexpected weather disasters like hurricanes and earthquakes
  • army of Hexas cleaning after big events - little and light rubbish like foils, cardboards or aluminum cans can be transport to separate bins and recycled
  • urban art – creating mossgrafitti, deploying seed bombsstencils
  • many, many other non-violent apps

via: personalfactory

9 months ago / 0 notes
photo set »

personalfactory:

" This year’s TEDxKraków conference will be followed by an entire weekend of making, appropriately titled Maker Weekend (26-27.10.2013). The two-day event will feature workshops by such groups and organizations as Alvernia Studios, Untitled Kingdom, WebMuses, Code for Poland and our very own speakers such as Trine Hahnemann’s bread baking workshop and Gever Tulley’s Tinkering workshop. Well today we have published the full schedule and registration links on our website, so check it out, sign up and start making! Click here: Maker Weekend.” ~ tedxkrakow.com

"The workshops cover all sorts of subjects, so everyone should find something that interests them. See below what kind of workshops, meetings and open events have we prepared for you:

  1. Alvernia Studios – film workshops
  2. Code for Poland – programming workshops
  3. Materialination - 3D printing workshops
  4. Bread Baking Workshop
  5. Czysta ReForma Theatre - Courage and performance workshop
  6. Untitled Kingdom UIKitDynamics – Liven up your interface!
  7. Untitled Kingdom - 3D design workshops
  8. Open Pitch Swarm – Hive53
  9. Grupa LASEM
  10. TINKERING WORKSHOP – Tinkering Workshops for Children and Grandparents
  11. LUKKA – Creative Making Workshop - build a MOBILE with us
  12. Illustration and Photography Workshop: Portraits
  13. PanieiPanowie – Vocal Workshop
  14. Workshop of the Art of Brewing Coffee with a Finjan
  15. WebMuses – Responsive Design Workshop
  16. Najedzeni Fest – Culinary Workshops
  17. Krakowski Teatr Tańca – Premiere of the Show “Polyamory”

~ http://tedxkrakow.com/en/events/49-MakerWeekend

9 months ago / 4 notes
photo set »

personalfactory:

Portabee GO - new $395 foldable 3D printer

Romscraj, developer of the Portabee 3D printer, launched an ultra portable, sleek and robust, Portabee GO 3D printer. Portabee GO 3D printer can be easily folded up for easy transport. When folded, the Portabee Go is only 8cm high, 22cm long and 20cm wide, so you can easily take it in a haversack on a bicycle. Portabee GO also features ultra precise solid steel linear guides, heated printbed and 0.4mm nozzle.

Specs:

Machine Dimensions (without filament and power adapter)

  • Folded: 208mm x 225mm x 79mm
  • Deployed: 208mm x 225mm x 277mm

Recommended Printing Specifications

  • Wall thickness: 0.48mm
  • Layer thickness: 0.1mm

Build Volume: 120mm (x-axis) x 178mm (y-axis) x 131mm (z-axis)

Build Materials: PLA

Portabee GO is available for pro-order at romscraj’s store for US$395.

~ 3ders.org

9 months ago / 14 notes
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